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Seeding Socioeconomic Avalanches! [Hacked by WordPress; filtered by Google!]

Archive for 2008

How Much Can a Single Natural Event Affect You?

Posted by edro on December 26, 2008

How prepared are you for human enhanced natural events?

Cyclone Nargis – May 2, 2008

Cyclone Nargis (also called Very Severe Cyclonic Storm Nargis), a strong tropical cyclone, struck Myanmar on May 2, 2008, causing catastrophic destruction, killing  at least 146,000 people with thousands more still missing.  [Independent sources estimate the number of fatalities at more than 1 million.]

Foreign aid workers estimate that about 3 million people severely affected and were made homeless. According to a study,  up to 3.2 million Burmese lost their homes as a result of Nargis.

Percentage of the population affected by Cyclone Nargis: ~ 6.6% of Myanmar’s population

[Note: Population of Myanmar is about 48,798,000]

Sichuan Earthquake – May 12, 2008

The quake toll according to USGS:

  • Death toll: At least 69,185 people were killed.
  • No injuries: 374,171 people were injured.
  • Other: 18,467 missing and presumed dead in the Chengdu-Lixian-Guangyuan area.
  • More than 45.5 million people in 10 provinces and regions were affected.
  • At least 15 million people were evacuated from their homes.
  • More than 5 million were left homeless.
  • An estimated 5.36 million buildings collapsed.
  • More than 21 million buildings were damaged in Sichuan and in parts of Chongqing, Gansu, Hubei, Shaanxi and Yunnan.

Percentage of the population affected by Sichuan quake: 3.41% of China population

[Note: Population of China is about 1,335,530,000 or 19.8% of the world population.]


As one of the coldest winters on record looms over Sichuan, more than 1 million families displaced by the May 12 earthquake are still without proper homes, a senior provincial official said on Friday. China Daily. A home-bound migrant worker from Sichuan carries her child in a railway station in Shenyang, Liaoning province on Friday, after failing to find a job in the city. Many people displaced by the May 12 earthquake have left their hometowns in search of work. [Agencies] Image may be subject to copyright.

Next:

Floods leave 2.5% of Colombia’s population homeless

Posted in colombia, floods, landslides, Myanmar, population toll | Tagged: , , , , | 6 Comments »

Obama Inauguration Carbon Footprint

Posted by edro on December 16, 2008

U.S. President-elect Barack Obama insists on the need to develop new forms of energy

“In the 21st century, we know that the future of our economy and national security is inextricably linked with one challenge: energy,” Obama told a news conference. “All of us know the problems that are rooted in our addiction to foreign oil. It constrains our economy, shifts wealth to hostile regimes and leaves us dependent on unstable regions.”

“To control our own destiny, America must develop new forms of energy and new ways of using it. And this is not a challenge for government alone— it’s a challenge for all of us.”

What about Climate Change Mr President-elect?

“We will make decisions based on the facts, and we understand that facts demand bold action,” Obama said.

What about the carbon footprint of your inauguration?

The President-elect forgot to mention that Disa orchids will be flown in for his inauguration from New Zealand within 24 hours of being picked!

The total bill for Mr Obama’s inauguration, including cost of the security, which will be paid by the taxpayers,  will probably exceed the $160million [Figure revised according to the media estimates on January 20, 2009.] At a global average of  584g of CO2/GDP dollar, the inauguration carbon footprint on cost basis alone would be 93,400 metric tons [MT] of CO2.

[But, hey, that’s nothing compared with the trillion-dollar bailouts being handed out to any bank/corporation large enough to blackmail the state!]

As for the additional CO2 created by an estimated 2 million people swarming Washington DC for the ceremony, add another 44,000 MT. By January 21, 2009, the inauguration carbon footprint will have exceeded 137,400 MT of CO2.

U.S. President-elect [do as I say, don’t worry about what I do] Barack Obama looks on as Steven Chu, director of Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, speaks after being introduced as Obama’s Energy Secretary during a news conference in Chicago, December 15, 2008. Obama also named former Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) chief Carol Browner (R) to head a new council to coordinate White House energy, climate and environment policies, and Lisa Jackson (2nd-R), chief of staff for New Jersey’s governor, to run the EPA. REUTERS/Stephen J. Carrera. Image may be subject to copyright.

Ordering orchids from New Zealand for the presidential inauguration is a callous disregard for the environment; it also rates high, “Scale F,” on the Adolescents Social Insensitivity scale

See:

– The Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III (MCMI-III)

– The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) – [published by the American Psychiatric Association]

– The mental disorders section, International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD)

Related Links:

Posted in air pollution, CO2, new zealand, Social Insensitivity, Steven Chu | Tagged: , , , , | 10 Comments »

Earth’s Human Induced Antiphase Nears Completion

Posted by edro on December 10, 2008

Human-induced planetary antiphase is entering its final stages

About 99.98 percent of human effort goes to debilitate the ecosystems. In other words, for every single step taken to restore the natural life support services, humans take 6,400 steps in the opposite direction, destroying the planet’s ability to maintain life.

What’s the Earth’s Antiphase?

A brief definition: Antiphase is the condition in which the planet’s life support systems switch at various thresholds from their normal, functioning states to dysfunctional, hostile and destructive modes through  Positive Feedback and Collapse.

anthropogenic-antiphase-1
Planet Earth approaches the final stages of human-induced antiphase.

Some of the services provided by Earth’s ecosystem are withdrawn due to the collapse of those systems, while other services switch in the antiphase to become hazardous forces.

In the final stages of the antiphase the services provided by the air, water and soil will no longer be available, at least not to their full extent. Instead the poisonous, polluted  air will pose  serious threats to our health by way of causing respiratory and blood diseases, and to our survival by way of accelerating climate change.

The water pollution will jeopardize our well being through water-borne diseases, while water scarcity could lead to regional, and continental wars.

The water cycle will be disrupted phenomenally.  Extended droughts throughout the globe will affect our food supplies causing land erosion, crop failure and famine, while extreme rain events which trigger flooding and mudslides, which would destroy most of our remaining fertile lands, both events ending in more human displacement, regional conflicts and wars.

In the antiphase, the rising sea levels will inundate more of our coastal towns, dramatically increasing the numbers of climate refugees. Food and water scarcity will lead to violence, riots and civil wars.

Antiphase will turn our oceans from being the source of life to acidified, putrid cesspools of pollution and death.

The antiphase will rapidly transform humans into vicious animals, fighting each other for water, food, fuel, land and all other dwindling natural resources. The fighting, in turn, enhances the positive feedbacks, accelerating the downward spiral toward collapse.

When the cost of maintaining human species exceeds the planetary budget, and about 80 percent of the earth’s natural capital has been depleted, human species would be committed to extinction.

The antiphase is now entering its final stages of completion. [But it can be stopped by massive global action that must be taken immediately.]

Related Links:

Posted in accelerating climate change, natural capital, planetary budget, positive feedback, species extinction | Tagged: , , , , | 20 Comments »

Google: The 21st Century Thought Police

Posted by edro on December 9, 2008

It’s unacceptable for an advertising  corporation to control the world’s flow of information

Google Must Go!

blocked-by-google-n

“With Google at the top of the information food chain, Internet community has less rights to unofficial political information than did the Soviets/Russians under the KGB.

“This can only happen in Google’s AMERIKA!

Related Links:

Posted in advertising corporation, blogging, Conspiracy Against the Public, information food chain, Internet community | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

When Will Food Riots Break Out Across the U.S.?

Posted by edro on November 25, 2008

See main Entry at >> The Land of Plenty [of hungry people]

Loss of topsoil, land degradation and desertification are global phenomena, which are rapidly destroying our ability to feed the world population

Unless comprehensive action is taken globally to stop the deadly trends, food riots will be commonplace throughout the world in the very near future.


Severely degraded land. Photo: Unesco. Image may be subject to copyright.

Related Links:

Posted in climate change, energy, future, lifestyle, Loss of topsoil | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Desertification: A Most Powerful Mechanism of Collapse

Posted by edro on November 22, 2008

About 35 % of China’s agricultural land is affected by desertification

The world must help China reverse its collapse feedback!

See News Entry >> China’s Topsoil Nightmare Is Real


Dead/withered trees near the Minqin oasis caused by falling level of groundwater. Photo Credit: Benoit Aquin, The Walrus. Image may be subject to copyright. Click here for photo album.

Related Links:

Posted in food production, land degradation, Mechanism of Collapse, traditional agriculture, Wild Facts | Tagged: , , , , | 3 Comments »

Image of the Day: Hong Kong Skyline at Night

Posted by edro on November 17, 2008

Hong Kong: Facing an Increasingly Uncertain Future

Hong Kong may be among the world’s first Megapolises to experience a total collapse


The night skyline of Hong Kong, Victoria Harbour and Kowloon
, as seen from Victoria Peak, the tallest mountain on Hong Kong Island. With a population of more than 7 million, HK is one of the most densely populated areas in the world. Author: Diliff. Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.

Related Links:

Posted in energy, environment, future, lifestyle, pollution | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

A Most Powerful Mechanism of Collapse

Posted by edro on November 4, 2008

A Most Powerful Mechanism of Collapse:
The Loss of Will to Live

Pawning the Last Valuable Possession

The will to live is the ultimate human phenomenon maintained by a fine balance between the four interrelated elements:

  • Health of the environment
  • Physical and mental well being
  • Nature’s supplies and services
  • Societal vigor

the-will-to-live

As the demands on nature multiply,  the environment progressively deteriorates and civilization becomes increasingly dysfunctional, the balance exponentially declines and the future of human species, entirely by their own making, becomes rapidly bleaker.

What future is there for a dying addict who has pawned his last item of value, craving  only for one last strong fix?

Related Links:

Posted in exponential growth, G20, nature's services, nexus of life, societal vigor | Tagged: , , , , | 13 Comments »

Zeitgeist Movie

Posted by edro on October 22, 2008

Zeitgeist Movie

Apart from the idealistic vision of the future blended in by the Venus Project, rather similar to The Jetsons futuristic utopia, and bearing in mind that the presentation lacks ecological reality including limits to growth and energy consumption, a lot of useful information on this video make for an interesting watch!

Related Links:

Posted in banking fraud, corrupt system, debt, futuristic utopia, monetary system | Tagged: , , , , | 1 Comment »

The Deadly Dozen Diseases

Posted by edro on October 8, 2008

The “Deadly Dozen” Fits into the Collapse Jigsaw!

WCS has identified 12 deadly pathogens that could spread into new regions aided by climate change

A report by Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), released on October 7, lists 12 deadly pathogens that could spread globally as a result of climate change affecting the wildlife, which could then jump species barrier to infect and spread among humans. (Source)

The deadly diseases are:

  • Avian influenza
  • Babesia
  • Cholera
  • Ebola
  • Intestinal and external parasites
  • Lyme disease
  • Plague
  • Red tides
  • Rift Valley fever
  • Sleeping sickness (trypanosomiasis)
  • Tuberculosis
  • Yellow fever

The Dynamics of Collapse

Three major causes of global collapse triggered by the first wave of the world’s collapsing cities, which were previously listed in EDRO’s Dynamics of Collapse, include the “deadly dozen” diseases in the WCS list:

  • Spread of pandemic diseases
  • Foodborne, waterborne, airborne and insectborne infectious diseases (viral, bacterial, parasitic, fungal, prion)
  • Epidemics of plant and animal diseases

Related Links:

Posted in dynamics of collapse, Ebola, Lyme disease, Red tides | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Six of the Reasons Why California Faces a Major Crash

Posted by edro on September 29, 2008

submitted by a CASF Member

California Accelerating To Major Crash!

1. Exponential Growth Economy. California, a subset of planet Earth [really!] is a finite entity with finite resources. The blind, brainless monster of exponential growth economy, a creature of the US political economy and Calif politics, demands infinite resources, especially energy, and services, especially carbon sinks, to continue its malignant growth. Whether Calif is governed by Arnold Schwarzenegger or a super-intelligent android back from the future, it makes very little difference in the ultimate outcome—a major crash.

2. Centralization. As the rate of increase in the complexity of Calif socioeconomic “model” [therefore its governance and decision-making processes] accelerates, the region becomes more vulnerable and susceptible to violent oscillations against even the slightest of changes in its “equilibrium state.” [Visualize the chaos that would occur on a crowded, fast-moving 8-lane highway, when a single vehicle goes out of control.]

3. Complexity. The disastrous impact of hurricane Ike on the power grid earlier this month,  which left up to 5 million people without power, was a stark remainder and yet another a wake-up call to how complex systems, the centralized power grid, could collapse “suddenly” and  with disastrous consequences. There will be many more instances of systems collapses, some more paralyzing than the others, in the country, especially in those states that are burdened with higher levels of socioeconomic complexity, in the coming weeks, months and years.

4. Information flow. To identify the exact nature of problems that beset a complex system, build an accurate picture of interconnectivity that exists between those issues, and create long term [syn: sustainable] applicable solutions, the decision-makers require:

  • Accurate, detailed, up-to-date information – currently NOT supplied!
  • Thorough knowledge of how each component of the system works – presently NOT available!
  • Deep understanding of how those components operate [or don’t operate] in interconnection [syn: unison] – NOT on the menu, right now!

5. Personal stake, 2nd-home mentality. The decision-makers must understand the consequences of a major crash [societal or ecological.] When a major crash occurs in any country, or large geopolitical region, there would absolutely be no guarantee of containment. The knock-on effect of any major crash [or multiple smaller crashes] would render futile most “survival insurance plans,” for example, 2nd homes, or hideaway cabins in less populated states, or in “safer” countries.

6. Radical Changes. Desperate problems require “radical” solutions. California suffers from socioeconomic gangrene. Cosmetic dressing only hides symptoms of the disease temporarily, but delaying the cure will kill the patient. Unfortunately, deep-seated fundamental changes to save the community of life are not allowed at the expense of GDP growth .

Original Entry:

Related News Links:

Related Links:

Posted in 2nd-home mentality, calif, collapsing cities, Intelligent Communities, radical economy, Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

A Good Move Generally in the Right Direction

Posted by feww on September 16, 2008

Working Toward Low-Energy Communities


Volunteers from Transition Forest Row in East Sussex cut grass and weed around gooseberry bushes in a field loaned to them by a nearby college. (Courtesy of Mike Grenville). Source: Christian Science Monitor.

Transition Movement

Christian Science Monitor published the following report about the “Transition Movement,” which apparently started in England and is becoming popular here in the US.  (www.transitiontowns.org)

“Transition Towns (or districts, or islands) designate places where local groups have organized to embrace the challenge of adapting to a low-oil economy.”  CSM reports. More …

Related Links:

Posted in climate change, energy, environment, future, lifestyle | Tagged: , , , | Leave a Comment »

13 things you should know!

Posted by edro on September 16, 2008

Submitted by CASF Members Committee – edited for brevity

The 13 things you should know about the world before departing prematurely!

The facts about money fetishism, the rich, government, corporatism and CO2 pollution you always wanted to know, but were too afraid to ask!

1. How much CO2 pollution did humans produce last year?
The 2007 total for anthropogenic CO2 pollution was 38,058.66 MMT [38,058,660,000,000 kg]

2. How much CO2 does my dollar make?
Each dollar you earned, or spent in 2007 produced about 1.3lb (584g) of CO2.

3. What’s the total value of the world’s financial assets, population and income?

  • The total value of the world’s financial assets in 2007: $187 trillion.
  • World population 2007 (World Bank) : 6.61 billion
  • GNI per capita 2007 (PPP) : 9,816 (International Dollars)
  • World GNI : 64.9 trillion (International Dollars)
  • World GDP: 65.17 trillion (International Dollars)

4. Who was the largest single producer of CO2 pollution in the world?
Mr. Warren Buffett, aka the Sage of Omaha [Nebraska.] He, by way of his wealth, was responsible for producing at least 12,618,000 tons of CO2 [12.62 MMT of CO2] in 2007. Mr. Buffett’s pollution account balance put a new slant on “filthy rich.”

5. What group of people accounted for the highest per capita emission of CO2 in the World?
The world’s billionaires. The world had 1,125 billionaires in the 2007/2008 financial year, with the total assets of about $4.38 trillion. They produced a total 891.43 MMT of CO2 in 2007.

[Note: “The above figure is an abstraction. In reality, however, the world’s richest people are responsible for the bulk of CO2 pollution because as Praetorian Guards of the exponential growth economy they disallow and suppress any change to a sustainable system stifling all initiatives toward an eco-centered, low-carbon, ‘oikonomia,’ or economics for community.”]

6. What about the corporations?
The global 2000 companies and therefore their shareholders accounted for $30 trillion in revenues, $2.4 trillion in profits, $119 trillion in assets and $39 trillion in market value in 2007. [Source:  Forbes.]

Therefore the world largest 2000 corporations were responsible for at least 65 percent of all man-made CO2 emissions in 2007—total CO2 emissions of about 24,738.13 MMT [24,738,129,000,000kg]

7. Can we meaningfully reduce our CO2 emissions?
Not without a complete change in our system of political economy [aka, exponential growth economy] and therefore the structure of government.

8. What is the role of government in all this?
The world governments are best described as mostly organized mercenary forces whose first priority is to protect the wealthy [who, for all intents and purposes, appoint them to office] against rest of the population. By extension, the governments’ protection of the wealthy and their money fetishism perpetuates the political economy and their illegitimate offsprings, the corporations, behind whose Alice-in-Wonderland legal defense mechanism the rich comfortably hide.

9. How could the world function without governments?
There is no reason why the governments must be elected from among the thugs and criminal elements. Instead, volunteer candidates could be elected to run the government, much in the same way as the NGO’s operate.

10. How do they make their decisions?
They don’t; the entire nations do. In the age of Internet there’s no reason why each issue of public interest cannot be put to a referendum. The job of volunteer governments is to ensure fair play. They, in turn, are supervised by other volunteers to prevent potential abuse.

11. Where would the corporations and all of their employees go?
In the absence of mercenary governments protecting the predatory corporate system, and in a healthy economic environment, where  a system of economy working for the life communities has outmoded the prevailing political economy, most of the world’s corporations will end up in the dustbin of history. And rightly so!

Business that are beneficial to the life communities and do not cause any additional impact on the environment by way of their size, nature or scale of operation can re-organize as  co-operatives and non-profit entities

12. What about our national security?

In a world savaged by human-induced climate catastrophes and human-enhanced natural ‘disasters,’ and in the absence of any foreign military threat to the United States, our leaders have proposed to spend our tax dollars (2009) as follows

Total Outlays (Federal Funds): $2,650 billion
MILITARY: 54% and $1,449 billion
NON-MILITARY: 46% and $1,210 billion [Source: War Resisters http://www.warresisters.org/pages/piechart.htm%5D

The United States transformed its economy into a permanent military economy after WWII with a lion’s share of its resources committed to military spending.

Here’s the dilemma:

A sane foreign policy would entail avoiding violence, rather than stirring chaos and starting wars so that the US can then intervene to end them. A peaceable United States, however, couldn’t justify an ever-growing military machine if there were no wars.

For the sake of protecting the military machine [and continue with the empire-building,] wars have become a permanent feature of world events.

As the overall size of the political economy grows, so does the need for creating more chaos and starting new wars through political deception and false-flag operations. Instead of ensuring national security and protecting the citizens, the military machine does its utmost to achieve the opposite result by endangering the country through creating wars and provoking violence throughout the world, simply to justify its own existence. Here is the classic example of “tail wagging the dog!”

To decrease the level of violence, the United States must undertake political and military decentralization. “Decentralization of the United States would also add to the security of other nations.” Say Herman E. Daly and John B. Cobb, Jr. in for the common good: redirecting the economy toward community, the environment, and a sustainable future.

“The United States has developed into a highly centralized society that could be virtually halted in its tracks by a few relatively small acts of sabotage. For example, the electrical grid on which the entire nation depends could be put out of commission [easily, by a determined saboteur.] A blackout would not stop the planes in the air or the tanks in the field, but the backup systems of communication, supply, and management would be disastrously disrupted. Yet defense planning pays little attention to these matters.” Say Daly and Cobb.

Aside from rare acts of sabotage, the disastrous impact of hurricane Ike on the power grid last week, which left up to 5 million people without power, should be a stark remainder and a wake-up call to how vulnerable our centralized power grid is to seasonal acts of nature, especially the natural phenomena enhanced by climate change.

Why isn’t decentralization happening? Daly and Cobb identify two major obstacles: “The first is the political power of groups that profit from military spending.  The second is extreme difficulty of dealing in a humane way with the rapid shift in the whole economy.”

At least one of the two obstacles could be overcome, however. “If the United States makes a clean environment, human health, and community stability its goals, alone with a commitment to becoming more self-sufficient economically, the transition from a military economy to a civilian one may be affected without enormous pain.”

But how does more economic self-sufficiency help national security?

“… where there is economic self-sufficiency, national security need not involve fighting wars with distant enemies.  It does not require the ability to conquer external powers. It requires only the ability to resist aggression against itself.  Would the federation all 50 states be a likely victim of conquest? Would these states be in danger from Mexico or Canada?”

How do we protect ourselves and stabilize our world? What would it take to fight a war of aggression waged against us?

In a stable, demilitarized world, we would need only a small civil defense force to protect us against any aggression. Kirkpatrick Sale in Human Scale says: “The long human record suggests that the problem of defense and warfare is exacerbated, not solved, by the large state, and that smaller societies …  tend to engage in fighting less and less violent consequences. Indicating that a world of human scale politics would not be a world without its conflicts and disputations, but would likely be a world of comparative stability.”

13. What sort of reduction in energy consumption and therefore the CO2 emission levels could we expect if  we created all of the above changes?

The Committee Members of  Creating A Sustainable Future [what’s left of the future, AAR,] believe that if we the people

  • Replaced the world’s mercenary governments with volunteer, fully accountable organizations that are supervised by the electorate
  • Changed the prevailing political economy to an eco-centered system that provides “economics for life”
  • Criminalized the structure of corporations [rearranging the potentially useful ones to function as non-profits or co-operatives]
  • Developed our lifestyle to one of zero impact using sustainable models

If our energy abuse ends, the world demand for energy could fall by as much as 80-90 percent, resulting in CO2 emission levels approaching zero.

And if you’re still wondering whether a future would be possible with the same life-destroying systems of money fetishism, corporatism and mercenary governments in place, you haven’t read the above carefully!

Posted in economy, energy, environment, future, lifestyle | Tagged: , , , , | 25 Comments »

Images of the Day: Ike Was Here!

Posted by edro on September 14, 2008

Hurricane Ike: “Not the ‘Nightmare Scenario'”

The following image relates to a comment made by Cynthia Beal on The First Wave of World’s Collapsing Cities

Ike was here! (Matt Slocum / Associated Press). Image may be subject to copyright.

“The Day the Dead ‘Rose’ from their Graves!”

Floodwaters brought by Hurricane Ike cover a cemetery in Orange, Texas. September 14, 2008. (Smiley N. Pool/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images). Image may be subject to copyright.

Them Crosses Ain’t Like They Used to BE!

George Levias, 75, moves a cross from an exposed casket as he looks for a headstone at the Hollywood Cemetery in Orange, Texas. Several caskets were exposed after Hurricane Ike caused flooding in the area. September 15, 2008 (Eric Gay/Associated Press). Image may be subject to copyright.

Posted in climate change, energy, environment, future, lifestyle | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Nascent Characteristics of the Cosmos

Posted by edro on September 11, 2008

How Do You Fit into the Cosmic Scheme of Things?

1. The Cosmos is ethical.

2. The Cosmic Elements are altruistic.

The Cosmos Supports Life

Star Formation in Henize 206

Within the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), a nearby and irregularly-shaped galaxy seen in the Southern Hemisphere, lies a star-forming region heavily obscured by interstellar dust. NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope has used its infrared eyes to poke through the cosmic veil to reveal a striking nebula where the entire lifecycle of stars is seen in splendid detail.

The LMC is a small satellite galaxy gravitationally bound to our own Milky Way. Yet the gravitational effects are tearing the companion to shreds in a long-playing drama of ‘intergalactic cannibalism.’ These disruptions lead to a recurring cycle of star birth and star death. (Source)

Image Details

Object Name: Henize 206
Object Type: Star formation region in an emission nebula
Position (J2000): RA: 05h31m15.2s Dec: -71d03m58s
Distance: 163,000 light-years (50 kiloparsecs)
Constellation: Dorado (the Dolphinfish)

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/V. Gorjian (JPL)


The Structure of Cosmos is Altruistic

Spiral galaxy M51 [“Whirlpool Galaxy”]

NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope has captured these infrared images of the “Whirlpool Galaxy,” revealing strange structures bridging the gaps between the dust-rich spiral arms, and tracing the dust, gas and stellar populations in both the bright spiral galaxy and its companion.  (Source)

Image Details

Object Name: Messier 51
Object Type: Galaxy Pair
Position (J2000): RA: 13h29m55.7s Dec: +47d13m53s
Distance: 37,000,000 light-years or 11 Mpc
Magnitude: 8.4
Constellation: Canes Venatici

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/R. Kennicutt (Univ. of Arizona)

Posted in 286W, big bang, Cosmic Scheme, energy, environment, future | Tagged: , , , , | 1 Comment »